Photo by Zach Gross
photo by Zach Gross
Photo by Zach Gross
Photo by Zach Gross

Impressive, strange, a puzzle you want to solve, a social order changing before your eyes.

    - Alastair Macaulay, The New York Times, August 2016

Fleeting, mysterious and wholly alive.

    - Gia Kourlas, The New York Times April 2015

With finely honed dancing and a score by Chris Garneau, “Monument” shuttles eerily between the present and a rarely seen past.

- Siobhan Burke, The New York Times April 2015

With strong performances, Mr. Weinert and Ms. Kruger made a case for more than historical interest.

- Brian Siebert, The New York Times August 2015

With strong performances, Mr. Weinert and Ms. Kruger made a case for more than historical interest.

- Brian Siebert, The New York Times August 2015

 Weinert offers as a contemporary equivalent the convergence..., of the here and now and the placeless and the ghostly.

- Apollinaire Scherr, The Financial Times, August 2015

Weinert has the utmost respect for tradition, but is unafraid to experiment with novel ways to share his work.

- Nancy Wozny, Dance Magazine October 2015

I respect this on a lot of levels, but I also think it’s the most hilarious thing in the world. 

– Gia Kourlas, Time Out New York 
July 31, 2014

I was totally fascinated, both by the ingenuity of Weinert’s
rebellion and the larger context in which it fits.

– Jillian Steinhauer, HYPERALLERGIC
May 22, 2014

Going up against MoMA is a pretty bold and commendable move on Weinert's part. Dude deserves rounds for his ingenuity and audacity.

May 22, 2014

Performance-based artist Adam H. Weinert
is truly pushing the limits of the medium.

– Rachel Pincus, PSFK
May 19, 2014

Now choreography isn't something you can so easily show off in a museum environment. But Weinert has found a way to make it work.

– Leslie Horn, Gizmodo
May 16, 2014

Weinert and Adler-Ariele perform a duet involving a string of unlikely connections — shoulder on shin, foot on back, chin on foot — but, even when strained to their limits, they maintain an otherworldly coolness.

– Margaret Furher, The Huffington Post
September 10, 2012

Mr. Weinert in “Gobbledygook” was something new...
memorably vulnerable.

– Alastair Macaulay, The New York Times
August 19, 2012

Weinert first ventured into film with Match Box Dances (2011), four short, site-specific pieces. He approached them “like Polaroid photographs created in a fleeting modality.” Surpassing his expectations, the film has been screened at several festivals worldwide and has
received over 632,000 hits on Vimeo. 

– Cynthia Hedstrom, Dance Magazine
April 2012

The solo for Mr. Weinert is . . . the evening’s most startling and successfully expressive dance. There are images of alarm — claustrophobic turns, clutches at the walls, collapses — that make a real impression.

– Alastair Macaulay, The New York Times 
June 8, 2010

The initial vision is of a naked young man (Adam H. Weinert) . . . [as] a despairing wraith that William Blake might have painted.

– Deborah Jowitt, The Village Voice
June 8, 2010

Here the stark naked and brilliantly choreographed Weinert . . . starting prone at our feet, probes gravity and his wall like a caterpillar seeking a chrysalis hook.

– DJ McDonald, 
June 20, 2010

...four dancers executed simple phrases. These were sometimes fluidly beautiful: quick little blooms of movement that caught at the stacks — of language — Ms. Carson continually built and tore down. An understated solo for Adam Weinert was particularly thoughtful.

– Claudia La Rocco, The New York Times
December 7, 2008

‘Here Here’, a collaboration between Sloan and Dalton alumnus Adam Weinert (2003) who now dances with Shen Wei Dance Arts, was based on the principles of chance operations created by Merce Cunningham and John Cage . . . . The result was a complex work that didn't seem spur-of-the-moment at all. 

– Rachel Zar, Dance Teacher Magazine
May 20, 2010

The haunting work won us over from the first shot, a dance in yellow filmed on the streets of grimy, beautiful DUMBO. The collaboration between choreographer Adam Weinert, dancer Naomi Reid-Davis, musician Roarke Menzies and other assorted neighbors captured the seductive grit of industrial Brooklyn in the way that every edgy fashion shoot tries, and fails, to do.

– Paul Cox, 
March 9, 2010